Felicity Huffman, Lori Loughlin among dozens charged in college admission cheating scam

Felicity Huffman, Lori Loughlin among dozens charged in college admission cheating scam

Felicity Huffman, Lori Loughlin among dozens charged in college admission cheating scam

The United States Attorney's office in Boston announced charges against dozens of people accused in a nationwide college admissions scheme, including Oscar-nominated actress Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, of "Full House" fame.

Federal prosecutors said 33 parents bribed entrance exam administrators ― to facilitate cheating on exams ― along with varsity coaches and administrators. Secondly, the organization allegedly bribed college coaches to help admit the students into college as recruited athletes, regardless of their actual ability, prosecutors said.

A former Yale University women's soccer coach, Rudolph "Rudy" Meredith of Madison, Conn.is charged in the case with two counts of wire fraud.

The indictment accuses defendants of committing crimes between 2011 and 2019.

The U.S. Attorney's Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigation claimed in the indictment that the alleged scheme helped students gain acceptance to top schools by helping them cheat on college exams.

The indictment was filed by the United States attorney for the District of MA, and the documents outlining the racketeering conspiracy charges were unsealed on March 12.

At least 13 people, including Huffman and Loughlin's husband Mossimo Giannulli, were arrested Tuesday morning and expected to make their first court appearance later in the day.

Macy showed his support for wife Felicity Huffman on Tuesday at a Los Angeles courthouse.

Loughlin, a.k.a. Aunt Becky, apparently paid a total of $500,000 in exchange for having their daughters designated as crew recruits to USC, as evidence in emails from Loughlin. Another actress, Lori Loughlin, best known for starring in sitcom Full House, was also indicted. The FBI allegedly recorded phone calls involving the celebrities and a cooperating witness, leading to the indictment. - One of which is a founder of the California based non-profit Key Worldwide Foundation.

The payments ranged from $200,000 to $6.5 million, according to Andrew Lelling, the USA attorney in Boston, Massachusetts where the case was filed.

Federal prosecutors in Boston charged William (Rick) Singer, 58, with running the racketeering scheme through his Edge College & Career Network, which served a roster of clients, including CEOs and Hollywood actors.

"For every student admitted through fraud, an honest and genuinely talented student was rejected", Mr Lelling said.

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