Hurricane Florence Could Bring Up To 30 Inches Of Rain To Carolinas

Hurricane Florence Could Bring Up To 30 Inches Of Rain To Carolinas

Hurricane Florence Could Bring Up To 30 Inches Of Rain To Carolinas

The effects of Hurricane Florence can already be felt along the coast of North Carolina as of 12 p.m. on September 13.

According to Storyful, the video was shot at the Fish Heads Bar & Grill pier in Nags Head.

And then there's the major slowdown that's expected: as of Thursday, Florence was moving roughly 17 km/h, but once it makes landfall, it's expected to nearly stall, with its forward speed dropping to just 9 km/h or less.

The outer bands of Hurricane Florence, a large and unsafe Category 2 storm and one of 9 deadly storms circling the globe, landed on the North Carolina coast Thursday morning (local time).

Some forecasters have predicted it could be the most powerful storm ever to hit the region. Storm surge is why many of you have been placed under evacuation and we are asking citizens to please heed a warning.

Body surfer Andrew Vanotteren, of Savannah, Ga., crashes into waves from Hurricane Florence, Wednesday, Sept., 12, 2018, on the south beach of Tybee Island, Ga.

Rain projections also increased, with some locations along the North Carolina coast now expected to get up to 40 inches. Catastrophic river flooding and flash flooding will occur for a large portion of eastern North and SC.

If some of the computer projections hold, "it's going to come roaring up to the coast Thursday night and say, 'I'm not sure I really want to do this, and I'll just take a tour of the coast and decide where I want to go inland, '" said Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private Weather Underground forecasting service. Areas from Cape Fear to Cape Lookout face a potential 9 to 13 feet of storm surge, the National Hurricane Center warns, on top of the normal tides.

After spreading rain westward to the southern Appalachians and Piedmont areas, torrential rain is forecast to reach parts of the northeastern part of the United States next week.

More than 1,200 US airline flights scheduled for Thursday and Friday have been canceled, according to the flight-tracking service FlightAware.

Some 3,000 people died in the aftermath of that storm.

"Little change in strength is expected before the center reaches the coast, with weakening expected after the center moves inland", the National Hurricane Center said. The trend is "exceptionally bad news", said University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy, since it "smears a landfall out over hundreds of miles of coastline, most notably the storm surge". But, Hill added, those lane reversals will end soon: "At that point, they'll shut 'em down for the incoming storm".

LATER NEXT WEEK: The remnants of Hurricane Florence could bring some heavy rain to the D.C. region by next week.

The hurricane center also said the threat of tornadoes was increasing as the storm neared shore.

Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land.

"If you have not left now, you need to leave", McMaster said. But Hill said many residents still remained in their homes, possibly hoping to ride out the hurricane. In Virginia, 245,000 coastal residents were ordered to evacuate. It marks the beginning of a prolonged assault from wind and water, which - by the time it's over - is likely to bring devastating damage and flooding to millions of people in the Southeast.

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