Colorado Resident Hospitalized With Potentially Deadly Form Of West Nile Virus

Colorado Resident Hospitalized With Potentially Deadly Form Of West Nile Virus

Colorado Resident Hospitalized With Potentially Deadly Form Of West Nile Virus

According to World Health Organisation, there is one reported case of transplacental (mother-to-child) WNV transmission. Tests results confirmed West Nile Virus Thursday.

"Mosquito-borne diseases overall are increasing", CDC spokeswoman Kate Fowley told weather.com.

"Mosquitoes are weak flyers and won't travel far from where they are born - if there are mosquitoes in your backyard or neighborhood, they are likely laying eggs there as well", said Matt Helwig, a biolgist with the DEP mosquito program.

A northeast Colorado resident has been hospitalized with the most serious form of the West Nile Virus. A very small proportion of human infections have occurred through organ transplant, blood transfusions and breast milk.

Symptoms of the viral disease vary from person to person, the CDC noted. There were no reported cases of West Nile in the county a year ago.

"If there is a four-fold increase in the antibody count in the second sample, only then can we say it is a West Nile infection".

Overall, 39 cases of West Nile have been reported in humans as of July 24. They can include fever, headache, nausea and vomiting, but most people don't develop any symptoms at all. Of those, 23 cases involved meningitis or encephalitis.

For more tips on mosquito bite prevention, click or tap here.

Homeowners are also asked to eliminate standing water by cleaning eaves troughs, emptying bird baths, covering rain barrels with mosquito screens, getting rid of containers that collect water and landscaping for better drainage. These bodies of standing water are where mosquitoes lay their eggs.

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