Here's What Archaeologists Found Inside Egypt's Mysterious 2,000-Year-Old Sarcophagus

Here's What Archaeologists Found Inside Egypt's Mysterious 2,000-Year-Old Sarcophagus

Here's What Archaeologists Found Inside Egypt's Mysterious 2,000-Year-Old Sarcophagus

Three decomposed mummies were found in the sarcophagus, declared Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Mostafa Waziri.

Despite the presence of an alabaster head guarding the 2,000-year-old tomb, the astounding lack of silver and gold designs and trinkets has ruled out theories that the remains could be those of Alexander the Great.

Egypt's antiquities ministry had vigorously dismissed the chances of finding Alexander's remains inside the 2,000-year-old sarcophagus, and on Thursday its scepticism was vindicated.

Waziri stressed that none of the three mummies belong to a Ptolemaic or Roman royal family and the coffin does not have inscriptions or a cartouche bearing their names.

The tomb dating back to the Ptolemaic period found in the Sidi Gaber district of Alexandria.

He said: "We found the bones of three people, in what looks like a family burial".

The structure is nearly two metres high and three metres long, and is the largest of its kind ever found intact.

Bones in sarcophagus
Ancient bones sit in a pool of sewage water inside an Egyptian sarcophagus

Mr Waziri also said the mummies had decomposed her being in the ground for thousands of years.

"Preliminary examination suggests the skeletons belong to three army officers, one of them his skull shows an injury of an arrow", Shaban Abd Monem, a specialist in mummies at the Ministry of Antiquities, told Luxor Times.

The sarcophagus, nearly three metres across and two metres high, is believed to date from the early Ptolemaic period, which began following the death of Alexander in 323BC.

Video published online showed the reddish liquid from the coffin later being poured into the suburban street in Alexandria in which the tomb had been found.

The skeletons discovered inside the coffin will be transferred to the Alexandria National Museum for restoration, the Ministry of Antiquity said on its website. The 30-ton tomb was found at a depth of 5 meters beneath the surface of the land.

Egypt started opening the mysterious sarcophagus unearthed 20 days ago in Alexandria, amid rumors over a "possible curse" that could be cast on the world once the sarcophagus is opened.

He added: "We've opened it and, thank God, the world has not fallen into darkness".

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