California will vote to divide state into 3 parts in November

California will vote to divide state into 3 parts in November

California will vote to divide state into 3 parts in November

The Sacramento Bee reported that Draper's more ambitious ballot proposal to chop up California into six states died in 2014 when he failed to get enough signatures.

A proposal to split California into three states will likely be on the November ballot, according to the Secretary of State's website.

His campaign, called "Cal 3", received more than 400,000 signatures, which is higher than the state-required minimum needed to bring a proposal to the ballot.

The proposal is the brainchild of billionaire venture capitalist Tim Draper, 59, who made his fortune as an early investor in Skype and Hotmail, and launched a campaign called "Cal 3".

The initiative, which easily cleared the signature-gathering bar, would direct the governor to ask Congress for permission to split the states into the three entities, and charge the state legislature with dividing up California's assets and liabilities. Southern California would consist of 12 counties, including San Diego and Orange counties, the Inland Empire and much of the Central Valley. "All Californians deserve more from their state, and with Cal 3, more regional responsiveness and more meaningful results will create a promising future for everyone". The state's elaborate system of aqueducts would become a managerial-and political-challenge for three states instead of just one. State filings show he paid consultants and law firms almost $560,000 a year ago for work related to the proposal.

Even if voters embrace the radical plan, it wouldn't take effect without congressional approval.

Many times. The California Legislature agreed to split off areas south of the Tehachapi Mountains into a separate territory in 1859.

Northern California - This would include 40 counties including the San Francisco Bay Area and the remaining counties north of Sacramento.

A proposal to split California into three states will be on California's November ballot.

"California government can do a better job addressing the real issues facing the state, but this measure is a massive distraction that will cause political chaos and greater inequality", Maviglio told the Chronicle. "How are you going to tell a family that lives in Los Angeles they have to pay out of state tuition to go to Berkeley?" Each of the three new states would have to adopt a new constitution by convention or popular vote.

The plan would create three differently sized regions, but all would have roughly the same population.

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