FDA says harvest season over for E. coli-linked romaine lettuce

FDA says harvest season over for E. coli-linked romaine lettuce

FDA says harvest season over for E. coli-linked romaine lettuce

"The most recent illnesses reported to CDC started when romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region was probably still available in stores, restaurants, and in peoples' homes".

Avoid buying romaine lettuce unless you can confirm the source is other than the Yuma growing region. But because it takes 2 to 3 weeks from when a person gets sick with E. coli and when the case is reported to the CDC, the number of cases may still increase, reflecting cases that occurred when the tainted romaine was still available.

The Douglas County Health Department has confirmed one case of E. coli O157:H7 related to the outbreak in romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Arizona, region. This means that any romaine lettuce from the region that found its way to stores or restaurants is likely now past its 21-day shelf life.

Since 1995, there have been 78 outbreaks linked to leafy greens, he said.

"CDC is updating its advice to consumers".

This nasty outbreak has infected 172 people across 32 states, according to the CDC. Sixty-five percent of ill people are female. Of the 157 people who were ill that the CDC has information on, 75 have been hospitalized and 20 have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the form of kidney failure that can be fatal. One farm in Yuma has been identified as the source of the lettuce that sickened eight prisoners in Alaska, but FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb revealed Wednesday evening a bit of how complicated the case.

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