Microsoft co-founder finds lost World War II aircraft carrier near Australia

Microsoft co-founder finds lost World War II aircraft carrier near Australia

Microsoft co-founder finds lost World War II aircraft carrier near Australia

"Based on geography, time of year and other factors, I work with Paul Allen to determine what missions to pursue". "We've been planning to locate Lexington for about six months.it came together nicely".

The wreckage, located nearly 3km beneath the surface of the waves around 800km from Australia, was the first-ever aircraft carrier to be sunk.

Originally designed as a battle cruiser, the "Lady Lex" was converted into one of the Navy's first aircraft carriers in 1925. The U.S. carriers delivered a serious blow to the Japanese forces advancing on New Guinea and Australia, according to the statement. However, the USA lost the Lexington and 216 of its distinguished crew. The carrier was deliberately sunk by another USA warship after it was critically damaged by Japanese torpedos and bombs.

The Lexington, which had been affectionately dubbed "Lady Lex", was badly damaged by bombs and torpedoes, but the order to abandon ship was given only after a secondary explosion set off an uncontrollable fire. A total of 216 crew members died after the ship was attacked and more than 2,000 were rescued.

The USS Lexington, one of the first US aircraft carriers ever built, sunk during a heated World War II battle against the Japanese Navy. The Japanese lost one light carrier and another carrier suffered significant damage.

A team led by Portland Trail Blazers and Seattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen says it found the wreck of the USS Lexington, an aircraft carrier that was sunk in 1942's Battle of the Coral Sea with the loss of more than 200 sailors.

"We honor the valor and sacrifice of the "Lady Lex's" sailors - all those Americans who fought in World War II - by continuing to secure the freedoms they won for all of us", he said.

The Lexington, which has been credited with helping protect Australia from a potential Japanese invasion during World War II, was found Sunday roughly 800 kilometers off the coast of Queensland in northeast Australia. He's used his Petrel to discover several other sunken ships and artifacts, including the famed naval cruiser USS Indianapolis, which CNN reported Allen discovered in August 2017 at the bottom of the Pacific.

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