Jimmy Kimmel gladly accepts invite to fight Senate candidate Roy Moore

Jimmy Kimmel gladly accepts invite to fight Senate candidate Roy Moore

Jimmy Kimmel gladly accepts invite to fight Senate candidate Roy Moore

Democrat Doug Jones is crushing Republican Roy Moore in fundraising ahead of their upcoming special U.S. Senate election in Alabama, keeping alive his party's hope for an upset over a GOP rival stung by sexual misconduct accusations.

That led to a Twitter exchange between Kimmel and Moore that excited both sets of followers - 69,800 for Moore and 10.5 million for Kimmel. It all started when Jimmy Kimmel Live sent Jake Byrd, a fictional character who has appeared on the show before, to crash Moore's speech at the Magnolia Springs Baptist Church, posing as a fake fan.

Kimmel accepted Moore's challenge, saying he'll come to Alabama and they can even fight if Moore wants.

"Sounds great Roy - let me know when you get some Christian values and I'll be there!", Kimmel tweeted back at Moore.

That night, Kimmel elaborated on their dispute and set the terms for their showdown during his opening monologue. At my church, forcing yourself on underage girls is a no-no.

Kimmel went on to explain that he's a confirmed Catholic who prays, attends church, and is best friends with a priest. "I will come down there".

If you're open to it, when we sit down, I'll share with you what I learned at my church. And if you are, I accept, by the way. There is no one I would love to fight more than you. "I accept that invitation", Kimmel said.

Here's the problem that a lot of people don't seem to understand with the Roy Moore debacle down there in Alabama.

Kimmel later noted that if the two were to engage in fisticuffs, he would donate any ticket proceeds to charity.

Moore has been accused by multiple women of either molesting or trying to date them when they were teenagers. Kimmel said. "All right, tough guy, with your little pistol?"

The Doug Jones campaign outraised Roy Moore's campaign by a wide margin during October and the first three weeks of November, Roll Call reported.

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