Oops: Self-Driving Bus Crashes Two Hours After Vegas Launch

Oops: Self-Driving Bus Crashes Two Hours After Vegas Launch

Oops: Self-Driving Bus Crashes Two Hours After Vegas Launch

Las Vegas police have cited the driver of a semi-truck that crashed with a self-operating shuttle bus on the day the driverless vehicle debuted. Over the course of a year, the self-driving shuttle aims at providing a quarter-million residents and visitors of Las Vegas with first-hand experience using autonomous vehicle (AV) technology, exposing most riders to the technology for the first time.

There were no injuries reported, and the shuttle didn't suffer any major damage, according to a report by a local Fox news station. "It's going to hit us.' And then it hit us". So far, the driverless shuttles are doing better than the drivers of trucks.

"The shuttle didn't have the ability to move back".

A statement released by the city said the shuttle did what it was supposed to do by registering the truck with its sensors and stopping to avoid the accident.

According to city officials, it was the driver of the lorry that the bus crashed into that was at fault and not the technology itself.

Thankfully no one was injured in the incident and while it may appear a little embarrassing for the shuttle, which is part of a joint project of insurance giant AAA (American Automobile Association), transportation company Kelois and French tech firm Nayva, the blame is being placed exclusively on the delivery driver.

The minor crash caused a delay but the bus returned shortly after to pick up more passengers waiting in line. The sensors registered the possibility of a collision, and the shuttle stopped.

The self-driving bus, developed by Navya, does not have brake pedals or a steering wheel.

The shuttle is the first of its kind in the United States, and Navya, the French tech firm behind the bus, is also performing test programmes in London and Paris.

The shuttle was built by a company called Navya.

The bus was launched to shuttle people along the famous Las Vegas strip at an average speed of 25kph.

The driverless shuttle had just begun setting off on half-mile loops around the Nevada tourist haven, part of a joint project of insurance giant AAA (American Automobile Association), transportation company Kelois and French tech firm Nayva.

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