Eyes Turn to Difficult-to-Predict Hurricane Jose

Eyes Turn to Difficult-to-Predict Hurricane Jose

Eyes Turn to Difficult-to-Predict Hurricane Jose

With Irma diminishing to a tropical depression, a hurricane-battered nation could soon shift its attention to Hurricane Jose, now meandering around the western Atlantic Ocean roughly 300 miles northeast of the Turks and Caicos Islands.

Deputy Director at The Bahamas Department of Meteorology Jeffery Simmons speaking with The Bahama Journal said it too early to predict the storm's exact path but The Bahamas should be in the clear. Some of the models put the storm in the Atlantic, while others keep the storm closer to Maryland, Virginia or North Carolina. "None of the computer models, at this point, have it headed toward our state".

Downtown Miami on September 11, 2017, after it was hit by Hurricane Irma.

"The three-day cone still has it to the east of us moving parallel".

Caicos before Irma
Caicos before Irma

Powerful Hurricane Jose missed the Leeward Islands this weekend, but it might have a second chance to strike the Caribbean and possibly Florida, forecasters said.

The latest European model shows Jose circling around the west Atlantic for much of the upcoming week.

"By days 4 and 5, Jose should track toward the west-northwest with a bit faster forward motion as the aforementioned mid-level high strengthens to the northeast of Jose". There is some additional weakening possible in the coming days, and Jose could become to a tropical storm on Tuesday. The upside is hurricane season slows down from here until the end of November, so everyone along the coasts should be able to breathe easy again in a few short months. "Jose was nearly up to a Cat 5 at one point, so that brought up some pretty cool water and I'm all for storms double backing and weakening".

"Even outside the loop it won't be the same path as Hurricane Irma".

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