Google appeals against huge European Union anti-trust fine

Google appeals against huge European Union anti-trust fine

Google appeals against huge European Union anti-trust fine

The EU hit Google with the record fine - which broke the previous EU record for a monopoly case, against U.S. chipmaker Intel of 1.06 billion euros in 2009 - in June for illegally favoring its shopping service in search results.

The European Commission had found that Google's shopping service had seen traffic jump 45-fold in the United Kingdom when it began to abuse its dominance.

A Google spokesman said at the time that they "respectfully disagreed" with the ruling. The company declined to give further details of its appeal.

Google is still obliged to pay up despite the legal challenge, but it can put the money in a locked account until the court reaches a decision.

The €2.4bn fine against Google for illegally exploiting its 90pc search market share led to its parent company Alphabet's profits falling by 30pc in July.

In an interview with AFP, Europe's anti-trust chief Margrethe Vestager last week said some of that proposal "pointed in the very right direction", but could only be judged once in effect.

The owner of the world's largest search engine said it filed its appeal on Monday at the EU's General Court, based in Luxembourg.

"What Google has done is illegal under European Union anti-trust rules".

Spokesperson for the commission said it will defend its decision in court. It denied other companies the chance to compete on the merits and to innovate.

The EU is also expected to soon decide another case against Google over abuse of its dominance of internet search to impose its Android mobile operating system.

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